For if there are (at a venture) seventy-six different times all ticking in the mind at once, how many different people are there not — Heaven help us — all having lodgment at one time or another in the human spirit? Some say two thousand and fifty-two. So that it is the most usual thing in the world for a person to call, directly they are alone, Orlando? (if that is one’s name) meaning by that, Come, come! I’m sick to death of this particular self. I want another. Hence, the astonishing changes we see in our friends. But it is not altogether plain sailing, either, for though one may say, as Orlando said (being out in the country and needing another self presumably) Orlando? still the Orlando she needs may not come; these selves of which we are built up, one on top of another, as plates are piled on a waiter’s hand, have attachments elsewhere, sympathies, little constitutions and rights of their own, call them what you will (and for many of these things there is no name) so that one will only come if it is raining, another in a room with green curtains, another when Mrs Jones is not there, another if you can promise it a glass of wine — and so on; for everybody can multiply from his own experience the different terms which his different selves have made with him — and some are too wildly ridiculous to be mentioned in print at all.

Orlando, Virginia Woolf

Canada Malting plant on Canal Lachine, Montreal

Canada Malting plant on Canal Lachine, Montreal

Historically, media companies have been in the business of selling individuals to advertisers: you put together some kind of a product that people love, and then bundle that product with advertising. But BuzzFeed is different. It starts the same way, by building products that people love. But then, instead of inserting advertising into that product, it then sells advertisers its expertise at building such things.

Felix Salmon on BuzzFeed— Medium

Ten most recent half-conversations (courtesy iMessage)

1. I actually snuck out early for catchup with some friends back in…
2. Thanks. That’s sound advice
3. Hmm I can hop on and maybe help
4. True
5. No big plans for weekend yet. Booked tomorrow
6. Ok, no problem
7. The apes were great
8. We’ll reschedule
9. Haha yes
10. Your order from Academy Restaurant is out for delivery

Filip Noterdaeme compared the Marina Abramovic retrospective to Sarah Palin dressing a moose in Alaska, great for comedy but tragic for politics or art.

From his delightful The Autobiography of Daniel J. Isengart

It’s not that email is broken or productivity tools all suck; it’s just that culture changes. People make email clients or to-do list apps in the same way that theater companies perform Shakespeare plays in modern dress. “Email” is our Hamlet. “To-do apps” are our Tempest.

The developer raises up the great sword of technology and brings it down upon the plinth of culture—and the sword shatters. But never mind; we can go back to the forge to make a bigger, better sword for retina displays. And as we craft it we whisper that eternal prayer for the comfort of list-makers: This time will be different.

Doomed to Repeat It — Paul Ford — Medium

Amsterdam ain’t stingy with the charm.

Amsterdam ain’t stingy with the charm.

Abhörstation Teufelsberg

Abhörstation Teufelsberg

at Görlitzer Park - Berlin

at Görlitzer Park - Berlin

The idea of innovation is the idea of progress stripped of the aspirations of the Enlightenment, scrubbed clean of the horrors of the twentieth century, and relieved of its critics. Disruptive innovation goes further, holding out the hope of salvation against the very damnation it describes: disrupt, and you will be saved.

Jill Lepore: What the Theory of “Disruptive Innovation” Gets Wrong : The New Yorker (via justin-singer)